Brilliant Beards #5

It is common knowledge that wise men and sages (both fictional and actual) from nearly all times and cultures have rocked awesome beards.  This post is dedicated to them.

Brilliant Beards #5: Wizards

In its basic sense, the word ‘wizard’ simply means ‘someone who is wise.’  Beards have always been associated with wise men, sages, and philosophers.

Confucius:

Confucius

Socrates:

socrates

Plato:

plato

Aristotle:

aristotle_stone

Now, apparently Aristotle ‘caved’ and shaved his beard at the request of his pupil, Alexander the Great.  Supposedly Alexander wanted his soldiers to be clean shaven so that their foes wouldn’t be able to grab onto their beards during battle (prior to this Greek warriors had been famous for their beards; see Brilliant Beards #3).  Aristotle acquiesced in order to set an example for Alexander’s soldiers.  However, even if Aristotle un-manned himself, nearly all Greek philosophers kept their beards and beards became an identifying marker of a philosopher, so much so that a saying came to be known: “πωγωνοτροφία φιλόσοφον οὐ ποιεῖ” (“the beard doesn’t make the philosopher”).

And we can’t forget about the wisest of them all, the magi.  Even this dorky Christmas card picture makes sure they have proper beards!three-wise-men

And then there are the fictional wizards.  For simplicity’s sake I’ll limit my examples to the two most famous of all the wizards:

Merlin:

Wizard_merlin-sword-in-the-stoneWizard_merlin-kingarthur

Gandalf:

Gandalf Packs Up Gandalf (Howe)

So come on, unleash your inner wizard!

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